Edinburgh Fringe 2015: Day 4 – Pitschi the Kitten with Dreams

A sunny day! in August! in Edinburgh! Halleluljah! I swear, this never happens. Encouraged by the blue sky (I know), we set off for the relatively early performance of Pitschi the Kitten with Dreams by Theatre Fideri Fidera, performed solo by Natasha Granger.

We arrived on time at the Gilded Balloon Teviot, which is in term-time home of the type of student I didn’t associate with, although I now bitterly regret that. This place is beautiful and has a terrific study room!  

Miss Kitty enjoyed the general pink sparkliness of the occasion and was very struck by these glittery numerals.

Meanwhile, her mama was thinking “I hung about in the dank brutalist crap that was Potterow and missed out on THIS?”

 

 

We got terribly lost and ended up going up and down a turret, so the signposting could be improved. However, very helpful and kind staff pointed us in the right direction, and soon we were part of a small tide of girls and their mothers – I think I saw two boys, no more than three years old – queuing patiently. Miss K was having a difficult time with the baby noises but she coped and we were warmly welcomed into the show by Natasha… So – the by now familiar review format.

ACT: The only visible human is Natasha Granger, a very confident, talented and warm young actor (they’re all younger than me obviously). She engaged the audience very quickly, with her open and friendly style – I think it would be impossible to resist that smile and genuine joy she exudes. You really feel like she wants to tell you the story so much and can’t wait to share the fun with you. There are obviously a couple of people who change the images – from a book much-beloved in Switzerland about Pitschi – and cue the music, but the other main characters are some suitably deranged looking kittens – see below – as well as a stuffed dog, and various props (more on that later).


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Summary: This is the warm and enjoyable story of a kitten who didn’t want to be a kitten, and in the course of a day tries to be various other animals that you’d encounter on a Heidi-like hillside: a goat, a hen, a duck, a bunny etc. All very beautifully drawn and shown on the screen behind the action. Natasha plays her grandmother with great gusto – who knew that just putting on a scarf and using a walking stick to shake your booty to “Rumpf rumpf rumpf rumpf” would be so entertaining?  Kittens cannot, of course, be any of those animals and poor Pitschi has a very tiring and ultimately dangerous day, before she is rescued by granny, who is alerted by said dog. Lovely. There is a lot of audience participation but it was done without the slightest hint of sarcasm, unlike our show on Day 2…

Props: Mostly the stuffed animals, but also a bench, headscarf, skirt, basket of kittens (squee), bucket full of dangerously squirty rubber glove – be prepared to get wet – and a broom. The screen is supported by two pretty rustic poles, to complete the Swiss Mountain styling.

Take Home Message: Be yourself and make friends with people (or animals) who are different from you. Also – girls can be very funny (this was the only solo performance by a woman we’ve seen this week and she carried it perfectly).

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Miss K Review: “I thought it was lovely. She was so funny, especially I liked it when she was being her granny [Ed. she then demonstrated the granny walk several times throughout the day]. The kittens were very sweet although I got a bit scared when she was in the rabbit hutch and there was a bat and owl and wolf, just like the Fairly Tales one. I really liked being a bunny, she was very friendly.”

ASD/SEN notes: Access to the Dining Room at Teviot isn’t the easiest, although I’m sure there’s a better way in – there are regulations these days. In the room, you walk along a fairly narrow passageway towards the stage and are greeted by the actor. The seats are ranged up in rows, the floor and walls are all black, seating accessed by a single stairway – unless you sit further in you will have to get up and down as kids go past. There are no flashing lights, no lighting effects or smoke machines, no strobes or bangs. There is a little music played on the accordion but mostly it is just sung. The images are on a white screen, similar to those used in school or slide shows. At one point the audience are squirted with quite a lot of water and at another, children are asked to come up on stage and hop/dance like bunnies. There is a mild threat, in one scene near the end, but there is no lowering of lights or increase in noise – note that Miss Kitty did pick up on it though, even though it was very innocuous.

Miss Kitty rating: 10/10, definitely good.

Mama Scissors rating: 10/10 – a great introduction to theatre for all kids, enjoyable by old hands like Miss Kitty, performed with gusto and skill. I’m relieved (although surprised) they weren’t selling reproduction kittens or books, both of which would have done very well. (I will accept orders for the kittens, if anyone is interested).

Definitely go see!

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