Edinburgh Fringe 2015: Day 2

 

 

Day two started off overcast and was decidedly cool, even for Edinburgh in August. We arrived at 11am for the 11:10 performance of Jazzmatazz by Ali McGregor and crew.

We were at the far end of a queue consisting mostly of toddlers, babes in arms, their pregnant and/or tired mothers and few grandparents/dads thrown in for good measure. All in fine fettle and ready to explore the wonderful Spiegeltent (how can that be a tent mama?), we were greeted by a very enthusiastic Fringe staffer who ripped our tickets and welcomed the bright pink chihuahua currently accompanying us on our festival jaunts.

 

The tent is, as you can see, huge. We sat near the very front at the dance floor but there’s another tier of booth tables around the walls which, on balance, I’d choose next time. There were some mellow sounds coming from the three-piece band and a few kids attempted to get on the floor to make the most of the opportunity to lark about and not be told off.

 Said pink chihuahua, about to whack it’s head on the floor, again. It likes being thrown up and down a lot. You can see that she is probably at the top end of the age scale for this show, and very quickly began to feel uncomfortable.

Act: Ali McGregor’s Jazzmatazz, high quality singing and musical jazz aimed directly at children up to the age of 7 and their parents. There were lots of songs – only a few jazz classics, A-Tisket A-Tasket among them but lots of mash ups, including “who let the dogs out” and “single ladies” (or whatever that Beyonce track is called).  In between songs, Ms McGregor asks children things like “what do you do to cool down in the summer?” (of course there is no summer, badoom-tish), “what do you do when you feel happy?”, “what kind of animals do you see in the jungle?”. There’s usually a straight answer from the kids and she then makes a kind of witty remark about it, for the benefit of the parents. Almost entirely in good humour, although I’d say it’s a bit dry and sarcastic for kids who are old enough to know what’s going on. There’s lots and lots of dancing, led by two professionals who are not afraid to get into the kid mosh pit that forms around the front of the stage.

Summary: lots of songs, a bit of repartee, more songs, a little bit of boogying especially designed for parents of pre-verbal kids and all in a pleasant setting.

Props: the band, although you could argue that the children are a prop too. A bubble machine.

Performance: Ms McGregor has got a great voice. It’s clear, warm, rich and she is obviously very talented, as are the musicians and dancers – although they hardly got a look in, to be honest. In her bright red frock and matching sparkly shoes, she steals the show and can go from singing beautifully to chatting with a toddler quick smoothly.

Take home: Kids can enjoy jazz and live music, it doesn’t all have to be Singing Kettle. (You know what I mean if you’re Scottish).

Miss K Review: I thought it was okay. She was a good singer and I liked the band. I didn’t know many songs, and she didn’t sing any Raffi. It  was a bit busy and I got embarassed so we left early. I didn’t want to talk to her afterwards.

[Ed. Now, those who know Miss K will know that she is a chatty, fairly confident kid in spite of – because of? – her ASD. She has been going up to actors, singers etc and taking over Fringe shows for at least four years, sometimes to the dismay of less confident performers. Today was no exception and her hand shot up when she realised she’d get to speak into a microphone and answer questions from the lady. Today was the first time she’s been made to feel embarassed or shy about something she said, although I don’t doubt that was NOT her intention. However, sarcasm and dry wit are kind of lost on kids of a certain age, who are aware that they are the butt of some kind of joke and it’s not really one that they get… So take your kid, let them get up and dance and talk but make sure they’re not old enough to understand.]

ASD/SEN notes: The show is inside the spiegeltent which is nice and airy, high ceilinged and quite large. The access is not the easiest – buggies are left outside but that’s maybe because there were about 50 of them.  Steps up to the centre doors, and more steps, quite wide and shallow, from the side seating booths down to the central dance floor. The stage is thankfully up too far for it to be subject to stage invasions from the maddened crowd. There are lots of lights which are visible but none too bright, mirrors and stained glass windows around the upper walls and the ceiling is hung with red curtains. (see picture below). Sound quality was good – not too loud although it’s intense when the songs are playing. There were no flashing lights, bangs or strobes. A bubble machine in one song brought all the kids to a corner, where it was a bit too much – granny’s in particular liked taking the babies up and Miss K felt overwhelmed.  She spent much more time on my knee in this show than yesterday, even though the subject matter was in no way scary. (see the note above). Children in wheelchairs would need extra assistance to be in the crowd, if they were given access at all.

Miss Kitty rating: 5/10 (although the band and singer both got full marks for performance).

Mama Scissors rating: again, ditto. Quality of performance great, possibly not the right age group for us at 7 & 42.

 

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